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Austin Eye Doctor

Located on South Capital Texas Hwy Next to Lenscrafters

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Age Related Macular Degeneration and Your Central Vision

Did you know that age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss and blindness among adults aged 50 and above?

AMD occurs when the part of the retina responsible for your sharp central vision, the macula, begins to deteriorate. Central vision is the visual field that you rely on to focus on objects clearly, to read or to drive. As AMD affects your macula, the condition often results in gradual central vision loss. AMD does not cause complete blindness, as those affected by the condition are able to see by relying on their peripheral or side vision.

AMD is usually diagnosed as either dry or wet. The dry form is more common than wet macular degeneration. In dry AMD, light-sensitive cells in the macula gradually break down and slowly begin to blur central vision in the affected eye. Over time, central vision in the affected eye can be slowly lost as the macula begins to further deteriorate.

In its wet form, macular degeneration can lead to more severe vision loss, as the more advanced stage of the disease causes new blood vessels to grow beneath the retina. These new blood vessels are delicate and can leak blood and fluid, causing damage and scarring of the retina, leading to further vision loss.

The early and intermediate stages of AMD usually occur without symptoms. Only a comprehensive dilated eye exam can detect AMD. The eye exam includes a visual acuity test that measures how well you see, a dilated eye exam and the use of an Amsler grid. An Amsler grid consists of a grid of straight lines with a central focus point in the center. Someone with AMD may see the central area darkened or will report that the lines are wavy. This is a very effective and easy way for you and your eye practitioner to monitor changes in your central vision.

Aside from age, other risk factors that can increase your chances of developing AMD include smoking, high blood pressure, UV exposure and family history of the disease. It is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle, which includes quitting smoking, exercising regularly and maintaining normal blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Eating a diet rich in colorful vegetables and fish can boost the vitamins that naturally protect the eyes from AMD. We may recommend vitamin and mineral supplements based on your risk factors and level of developing macular degeneration.

Early detection of AMD is the best way to control the condition and reduce damage to your eyesight. That's just one of the reasons why it's so important to get a comprehensive eye exam from an eye care professional at least once a year.

COVID-19 Updates

Dear Valued Patients,

We are very excited to announce that based on the guidelines of the CDC and the American Optometric Association, our practice will begin seeing patients this coming Saturday, May 16, 2020.

Our new hours of operation for the very near future will be Wednesday’s, Friday’s and Saturday’s from 11:00 am – 6:30 pm. Patients will be seen on an appointment-only basis for the time being.

After going through challenging weeks, we appreciate your patience and understanding more than ever!

Our team is going beyond the expectations of healthcare facilities to ensure everyone’s safety. To achieve the highest level of protection, we are implementing new safety protocols, including regular UV-C sanitization between patients, social distancing, etc. Most notably:

As always, feel free to contact our office with any questions or to schedule an appointment. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Sincerely,Bartok Creek Eyecare

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We will reopen our practice this Saturday, May 16 !!! The health and safety of our patients and staff continues to be a priority. Again, thank you for choosing Barton Creek Eyecare, and we wish you and your family the best in health. Click here to read more.

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